Month: August 2020

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Florida Rep. Charlie Crist endorses Biden

August 30, 2020 | News | No Comments

Florida Rep. Charlie CristCharles (Charlie) Joseph CristGOP sees groundswell of women running in House races The Hill’s Campaign Report: Biden’s Tampa rally hits digital snags Biden rise calms Democratic jitters MORE (D-Fla.) threw his support behind former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenHillicon Valley: Biden calls on Facebook to change political speech rules | Dems demand hearings after Georgia election chaos | Microsoft stops selling facial recognition tech to police Trump finalizing executive order calling on police to use ‘force with compassion’ The Hill’s Campaign Report: Biden campaign goes on offensive against Facebook MORE’s 2020 bid on Thursday, saying Biden would be the best candidate to attract “independent and disaffected Republicans.” 

“Joe Biden’s record of getting things done speaks for itself,” Crist said in a statement, according to the Tampa Bay Times. “He has always put the American people above party lines and will continue to as President.”

Florida Rep. Al LawsonAlfred (Al) James LawsonThe Hill’s Campaign Report: Biden’s virtual campaign swings through Florida House approves bill banning flavored tobacco products Lobbying world MORE (D) has also endorsed the former vice president. 

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Crist, who previously served as the governor of Florida, left the Republican Party and became a Democrat in 2012, suggesting that he was too moderate for what the GOP had become. 

The one-term governor won his House race in 2016 after a string of unsuccessful bids for public office, including a challenge to then-Gov. and now-Sen. Rick Scott (R) in 2014. 

Recent polling shows Biden neck and neck with President TrumpDonald John TrumpSenate advances public lands bill in late-night vote Warren, Democrats urge Trump to back down from veto threat over changing Confederate-named bases Esper orders ‘After Action Review’ of National Guard’s role in protests MORE in the Sunshine State. A Florida Atlantic University poll released on Wednesday showed the president with a slim lead, within the poll’s margin error, against Biden well as against Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenWarren, Democrats urge Trump to back down from veto threat over changing Confederate-named bases OVERNIGHT DEFENSE: Joint Chiefs chairman says he regrets participating in Trump photo-op | GOP senators back Joint Chiefs chairman who voiced regret over Trump photo-op | Senate panel approves 0B defense policy bill Trump on collision course with Congress over bases with Confederate names MORE (D-Mass.) and Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Hill’s 12:30 Report: Milley apologizes for church photo-op Harris grapples with defund the police movement amid veep talk Biden courts younger voters — who have been a weakness MORE (I-Vt.). 

Crist argued in the op-ed that Biden stood the best chance of beating Trump due what he said was the former vice president’s appeal to independents and Republicans frustrated with the current state of their party. 

Biden’s campaign has touted his electability, citing his connection with working-class voters, as well as his more moderate stances on issues like health care. 

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenHillicon Valley: Biden calls on Facebook to change political speech rules | Dems demand hearings after Georgia election chaos | Microsoft stops selling facial recognition tech to police Trump finalizing executive order calling on police to use ‘force with compassion’ The Hill’s Campaign Report: Biden campaign goes on offensive against Facebook MORE holds a double-digit lead against his closest rivals for the Democratic presidential nomination.

But there are signs Biden’s support may be slipping, according to a new Harvard CAPS/Harris Poll survey released exclusively to The Hill.

The poll showed Biden with 28 percent support among registered Democratic voters, a 4-point drop since last month when a similar survey showed him at 32 percent. He’s trailed by Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenWarren, Democrats urge Trump to back down from veto threat over changing Confederate-named bases OVERNIGHT DEFENSE: Joint Chiefs chairman says he regrets participating in Trump photo-op | GOP senators back Joint Chiefs chairman who voiced regret over Trump photo-op | Senate panel approves 0B defense policy bill Trump on collision course with Congress over bases with Confederate names MORE (D-Mass.) and Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Hill’s 12:30 Report: Milley apologizes for church photo-op Harris grapples with defund the police movement amid veep talk Biden courts younger voters — who have been a weakness MORE (I-Vt.), who registered 17 percent and 16 percent, respectively.

No other candidate registered double digits. Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisRand Paul introduces bill to end no-knock warrants The Hill’s Campaign Report: Biden campaign goes on offensive against Facebook McEnany says Juneteenth is a very ‘meaningful’ day to Trump MORE (D-Calif.), the fourth-place finisher in the poll, notched 6 percent, while three other candidates, South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegScaled-back Pride Month poses challenges for fundraising, outreach Biden hopes to pick VP by Aug. 1 It’s as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process MORE, former Rep. Beto O’Rourke (D-Texas) and entrepreneur Andrew YangAndrew YangGeorge Floyd protests show corporations must support racial and economic equality Andrew Yang discusses his universal basic income pilot program Andrew Yang on the George Floyd protests in Minneapolis MORE, tied for fifth place with 3 percent each.

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Only three others, former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro, Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerRand Paul introduces bill to end no-knock warrants Black lawmakers unveil bill to remove Confederate statues from Capitol Harris grapples with defund the police movement amid veep talk MORE (D-N.J.) and billionaire philanthropist Tom SteyerTom SteyerBloomberg wages war on COVID-19, but will he abandon his war on coal? Overnight Energy: 600K clean energy jobs lost during pandemic, report finds | Democrats target diseases spread by wildlife | Energy Dept. to buy 1M barrels of oil Ocasio-Cortez, Schiff team up to boost youth voter turnout MORE, registered above 1 percent in the poll, taking 2 percent support each.

The Harvard CAPS/Harris Poll surveyed 693 registered Democratic voters from Sept. 22-24, and does not report a margin of error.

While Biden still leads in the poll, there were positive signs for Warren, who gained 4 points since a Harvard CAPS/Harris Poll survey conducted last month. The Massachusetts senator saw her support among black voters, a key Democratic voting bloc, more than double, ticking up from 6 percent in August to 13 percent at the end of September.

She also saw a 6-point gain among white voters, jumping from 15 percent in August to 21 percent in September, the poll shows. Biden, meanwhile, lost 10 points among white voters, falling from 35 percent last month to 25 percent now.

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“We confirm that Biden is holding on, but Warren is surging as she develops a national following within the primary electorate,” Mark PennMark PennThe Hill’s Campaign Report: Biden leads Trump by 6 points in new poll Biden leads Trump by 6 points as voters sour on pandemic response: poll Poll: Two-thirds of voters say the economy is on the wrong track MORE, the co-director of the Harvard CAPS/Harris Poll, said. “The Sanders campaign could be in real trouble if they do not stem the tide soon.”

The poll follows on the heels of a slew of other surveys showing Warren taking the lead from Biden. A Des Moines Register/CNN/Mediacom poll released last weekend showed her at 22 percent support, edging out Biden at 20 percent. And a Monmouth University poll found her leading Biden in New Hampshire, 27 percent to 25 percent.

Likewise, a Quinnipiac University national poll released on Wednesday showed Warren leading the pack with 27 percent support. Biden came in second place in that survey, with 25 percent support.

Still, the Harvard CAPS/Harris Poll survey released on Thursday showed that a plurality of voters — 34 percent — perceive Biden as the candidate with the best chance of defeating President TrumpDonald John TrumpSenate advances public lands bill in late-night vote Warren, Democrats urge Trump to back down from veto threat over changing Confederate-named bases Esper orders ‘After Action Review’ of National Guard’s role in protests MORE in 2020. Sanders and Warren are statistically tied for second place on that front, scoring 12 percent and 11 percent, respectively.

The Harvard CAPS/Harris Poll surveyed 693 registered Democratic voters from Sept. 22-24. The poll is a collaboration of the Center for American Political Studies at Harvard University and The Harris Poll. The Hill will be working with Harvard CAPS/Harris Poll throughout 2019.

Full poll results will be posted online later this week. The Harvard CAPS/Harris Poll survey is an online sample drawn from the Harris Panel and weighted to reflect known demographics. As a representative online sample, it does not report a probability confidence interval.

Twelve years after the candidate of hope and change swept into the White House, Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerRand Paul introduces bill to end no-knock warrants Black lawmakers unveil bill to remove Confederate statues from Capitol Harris grapples with defund the police movement amid veep talk MORE (D-N.J.) is testing whether another Democratic presidential candidate can ride a promise of renewing national unity to the White House. In the most polarized political climate in modern history, it’s not going well — a hint, perhaps, that Democratic voters are less in the mood to join hands with the opposition than under President Obama and more in the market for a street fighter or a safe bet to beat President TrumpDonald John TrumpSenate advances public lands bill in late-night vote Warren, Democrats urge Trump to back down from veto threat over changing Confederate-named bases Esper orders ‘After Action Review’ of National Guard’s role in protests MORE. ADVERTISEMENTBooker, long seen as a potential front-runner in the race for the Democratic presidential nomination, has positioned himself as the contender most able to heal the wounds wrought by naked partisanship. “The next president must be a healer, a uniter, who is called to the common cause of the country,” Booker told an audience in New Hampshire last week. “We make a mistake in this election if we demonize Republicans and say, ‘Hey, the position of the Democratic Party is to beat Republicans.’”  Some of Booker’s most ardent backers say his pledge to mend raw wounds is exactly why they support him. And, in interviews with nearly a dozen Booker supporters and advisers, many said he has created the infrastructure necessary to catch fire, especially if leading contenders like former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenHillicon Valley: Biden calls on Facebook to change political speech rules | Dems demand hearings after Georgia election chaos | Microsoft stops selling facial recognition tech to police Trump finalizing executive order calling on police to use ‘force with compassion’ The Hill’s Campaign Report: Biden campaign goes on offensive against Facebook MORE stumble. “We’re positioning ourselves to break through,” said Iowa state Rep. Heather Matson (D), a Booker backer. “People make up their minds at the last minute. What I see as I am either at events with Cory or hear from people who were at events is that once they get a chance to see him in person, hear his message, they love him.” Four months ahead of the Iowa caucuses, Booker faces the same dilemma that many Democratic candidates confront: They have limited time, and limited resources, to break through in what remains a crowded field, and few opportunities for a breakout moment that would allow them to do so. But Booker is better positioned than many of his low-polling compatriots. He commands a stage like few others running for the Democratic presidential nomination. Polls show he has higher favorable ratings than most of the rest of the Democratic field, suggesting the potential for upside growth. The most recent Iowa poll conducted for the Des Moines Register and CNN showed more voters see him favorably than any candidate except Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenWarren, Democrats urge Trump to back down from veto threat over changing Confederate-named bases OVERNIGHT DEFENSE: Joint Chiefs chairman says he regrets participating in Trump photo-op | GOP senators back Joint Chiefs chairman who voiced regret over Trump photo-op | Senate panel approves 0B defense policy bill Trump on collision course with Congress over bases with Confederate names MORE (D-Mass.), former Vice President Joe Biden, South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegScaled-back Pride Month poses challenges for fundraising, outreach Biden hopes to pick VP by Aug. 1 It’s as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process MORE and Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisRand Paul introduces bill to end no-knock warrants The Hill’s Campaign Report: Biden campaign goes on offensive against Facebook McEnany says Juneteenth is a very ‘meaningful’ day to Trump MORE (D-Calif.), hinting that Booker has room to grow. And he has won backing from more state legislators in early-voting states like Iowa, New Hampshire and South Carolina than any candidate except Biden and Warren. Those data points, if anything, serve to highlight the contrast with the harsher reality: Booker has never polled anywhere near his leading Democratic rivals in key early states. The early state polls show Booker’s high-water marks are months old. He has never polled higher than 7 percent in Iowa (in a March poll), 5 percent in New Hampshire (in February), 6 percent in South Carolina (also in March) and 3 percent in Nevada (from an August poll). ADVERTISEMENT“We did come into this race behind other candidates who have run nationally before,” campaign manager Addisu Demissie told reporters on Tuesday. “We definitely need to continue to expand our online and small-dollar universe and that is something we are very, very focused on here.” The fact that his message has yet to translate into a solid base of support has even some of his supporters wondering whether Booker is the man for the moment. Do Democratic voters want hope and change version 2.0, or do they want something else — a candidate who pledges wholesale change, or a candidate who represents a steady hand capable of beating Trump? As Booker searches for an opening, he is building a field team necessary to capitalize on any viral moment or boost in support. He has 50 staffers on the ground in Iowa and 30 employees in New Hampshire, both numbers that are expected to grow.  Demissie, Booker’s campaign manager, told reporters on Tuesday that the team had budgeted more than $4 million in payroll costs for the next three months alone. Some of Booker’s supporters believe the smorgasbord of choices Democratic voters face is what has held back so many of those voters from making a final decision. They believe getting Booker in front of as many voters as possible will translate into support — especially as the field narrows. “He checks off all the boxes that Democrats historically have looked for in a presidential candidate. He’s young, he’s visionary, he is articulate, he is very likable, he’s a policy wonk, he’s the future,” said Jim Demers, a veteran New Hampshire Democratic activist who was among Booker’s first backers. “But I think the biggest obstacle for almost all of the candidates, except for the three big-name candidates, is the size of the field.” “With so many people running, it has voters sitting and waiting for the field to winnow down. I can’t help but think if there were six or seven candidates in this race, Cory Booker would be in first place,” Demers said. Some early skeptics of Booker’s have become ardent backers. New Hampshire state Rep. Anita Burroughs (D), another member of Booker’s team, said she had been converted after meeting Booker at an event. “I actually had the question, is this guy the real deal or is this opportunism?” Burroughs said in an interview. Then she met Booker. “My husband and I were blown away by him. He connects with people in a way that I’ve never seen a politician do.” But to grow, Booker needs to earn media coverage — coverage that has become increasingly scant as impeachment inquiries into Trump become all-consuming. Some advisers worry that the focus on impeachment, Trump’s attacks on Biden and his son, and the growing consensus that a top tier has emerged have frozen the race at a time when Booker needs to be growing. “The press has limited resources as well, so a lot of their focus has been on Joe Biden, Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Hill’s 12:30 Report: Milley apologizes for church photo-op Harris grapples with defund the police movement amid veep talk Biden courts younger voters — who have been a weakness MORE and Elizabeth Warren, and the rest of the field hasn’t gotten that same level of attention. It’s one of those chicken and the egg situation,” Demers said. But, Demers added: “We have everything in place here to have a winning campaign.” — Max Greenwood contributed reporting Click Here: camiseta rosario central

Bennet releases housing affordability plan

August 30, 2020 | News | No Comments

Sen. Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetSome realistic solutions for income inequality Democratic senators kneel during moment of silence for George Floyd 21 senators urge Pentagon against military use to curb nationwide protests MORE (D-Colo.) on Thursday released his plan to improve affordable housing in the U.S. 

The plan calls for building affordable housing near jobs, reforming federal housing tax incentives and helping the middle class afford homes through measures such as down payment assistance and vouchers for low-income renters. 

 

A Bennet administration would expand investments in mass-transit projects, provide grants to reduce barriers to affordable housing and expanding the low-income housing tax credit.

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“A home is a platform for stability and upward mobility in America, but for too many families, owning a home is out of reach and the high cost of paying rent has pushed them to a breaking point,” Bennet said in a statement to The Hill. 

“We need to build more homes near good jobs and good schools and ensure people can actually afford them. That’s the bottom line for creating opportunity for all Americans,” he added. 

Bennet is among more than a dozen people running for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination. His campaign hasn’t gained significant traction in the polls, and he did not qualify for next week’s Democratic debate. Some of his fellow candidates have also put forth plans for affordable housing.  

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Ilhan Omar raises $1.1 million in third quarter

August 29, 2020 | News | No Comments

Rep. Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarHow language is bringing down Donald Trump Biden, Democrats seek to shut down calls to defund police McEnany, Ocasio-Cortez tangle over ‘Biden adviser’ label MORE (D-Minn.) raised $1.1 million for her reelection bid in the past three months, her campaign said on Monday.

The third-quarter haul is nearly double the roughly $617,000 she raised in the second quarter of the year. More than 55,500 individuals gave to Omar’s campaign over the past three months, with an average donation size of $14.55, according to her team.

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The vast majority of contributions to Omar’s campaign were made online, and 99.8 percent were under $200, her campaign said.

“For too long, Washington has catered to lobbyists and special interests, rather than the American people,” Omar said in a statement.

“Our movement is powered by small-dollar, grassroots donors. By putting people at the center of our democracy, we can get big money out of politics, and create the transformative change we need to tackle soaring healthcare costs, a warming planet, and build an economy that works for everyone.”

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Omar isn’t expected to face a tough reelection bid in 2020. Minnesota’s 5th District leans heavily Democratic — Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonWhite House accuses Biden of pushing ‘conspiracy theories’ with Trump election claim Biden courts younger voters — who have been a weakness Trayvon Martin’s mother Sybrina Fulton qualifies to run for county commissioner in Florida MORE carried it in 2016 by more than 55 points — and she has not drawn a serious primary challenger.

Still, her war chest will likely come in handy for other House Democrats facing more competitive reelection bids in 2020. Campaigns can funnel resources to other candidates and committees, especially in the face of expensive or particularly difficult races.

An attorney representing President TrumpDonald John TrumpSenate advances public lands bill in late-night vote Warren, Democrats urge Trump to back down from veto threat over changing Confederate-named bases Esper orders ‘After Action Review’ of National Guard’s role in protests MORE’s reelection campaign sent a letter to CNN on Friday threatening to sue the network over purported allegations of bias against the president.

Trump attorney Charles Harder wrote to CNN President Jeff Zucker warning that the Trump campaign intends to seek damages from the network based on secretly recorded videos posted in recent days by the right-wing group Project Veritas.

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“Never in the history of this country has a President been the subject of such a sustained barrage of unfair, unfounded, unethical and unlawful attacks by so-called ‘mainstream’ news, as the current situation,” Harder wrote.

Harder cited one CNN employee recorded by Project Veritas who alleged Zucker has a personal feud with Trump. Another employee captured on video complains that CNN does not live up to its “facts first” slogan, while a third lamented that the network wants to focus its coverage mainly on Trump and the ongoing House impeachment inquiry.

“The aforementioned examples are merely the tip of the iceberg of the evidence my clients have accumulated over recent years,” Harder wrote. “We also expect substantial additional information about CNN’s wrongful practices to become known in the coming days and weeks.”

Harder alleged that CNN’s actions constituted a violation of the Lanham Act, a law enacted in the 1940s that governs trademark use and false advertising.

CNN dismissed the lawsuit in a statement on Friday.

“This is nothing more than a desperate PR stunt and doesn’t merit a response,” Matt Dornic, a spokesman for CNN, said in a statement.

Trump, with Harder as his attorney, has threatened in the past to sue news outlets, but so far he has not followed through with the threatened litigation.

Harder did file legal action on Trump’s behalf against a woman who alleged the president kissed her without consent in 2016. A judge later dismissed Johnson’s lawsuit, and Johnson has since dropped it.

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A case against CNN would likely face significant hurdles on First Amendment grounds.

Project Veritas often records surreptitious videos and edits them in an effort to highlight allegations of liberal bias. The CNN videos were picked by conservative media this week, and appeared to be referenced in a tweet from Trump suggesting Zucker should resign.

The president routinely chastises CNN as “fake news,” targeting specific anchors and reporters and complaining about coverage he dislikes. His supporters often chant “CNN sucks” during campaign rallies.

CORRECTION: An attorney for President Trump has filed legal action against a woman who alleged misconduct by the president. A previous version of this article omitted that action.

Updated Nov. 13 at 2:37 p.m.

White House hopeful Joe BidenJoe BidenHillicon Valley: Biden calls on Facebook to change political speech rules | Dems demand hearings after Georgia election chaos | Microsoft stops selling facial recognition tech to police Trump finalizing executive order calling on police to use ‘force with compassion’ The Hill’s Campaign Report: Biden campaign goes on offensive against Facebook MORE Friday unveiled a new plan to support unions and workers’ rights to organize, and to restrict the “abuse of corporate power” over employees.

The plan, which promises to fight against “a war on organizing, collective bargaining, unions, and workers,” would seek to incentivize unionization and collective bargaining, prevent employers from hindering workers’ organizing efforts and bolster labor protections.

Biden and other Democratic hopefuls have aggressively courted union support, with Sens. Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Hill’s 12:30 Report: Milley apologizes for church photo-op Harris grapples with defund the police movement amid veep talk Biden courts younger voters — who have been a weakness MORE (I-Vt.) and Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenWarren, Democrats urge Trump to back down from veto threat over changing Confederate-named bases OVERNIGHT DEFENSE: Joint Chiefs chairman says he regrets participating in Trump photo-op | GOP senators back Joint Chiefs chairman who voiced regret over Trump photo-op | Senate panel approves 0B defense policy bill Trump on collision course with Congress over bases with Confederate names MORE (D-Mass.) frequently joining striking workers. The former vice president held his first campaign rally after entering the 2020 race at a Teamsters banquet hall in Pittsburgh. 

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“Strong unions built the great American middle class,” the plan notes. “Today, however, there’s a war on organizing, collective bargaining, unions, and workers. It’s been raging for decades, and it’s getting worse with Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpSenate advances public lands bill in late-night vote Warren, Democrats urge Trump to back down from veto threat over changing Confederate-named bases Esper orders ‘After Action Review’ of National Guard’s role in protests MORE in the White House.”

“Biden is proposing a plan to grow a stronger, more inclusive middle class – the backbone of the American economy – by strengthening public and private sector unions and helping all workers bargain successfully for what they deserve.”

Biden’s plan seeks to bolster unions’ power by codifying an Obama-era policy allowing for shortened timelines for union election campaigns, providing a federal guarantee for public sector employees to bargain for better pay, benefits and working conditions and supporting legislation to ban permanent replacements for striking workers, among other proposals.

The former vice president also promises to create a Cabinet-level working group to focus specifically on promoting union organizing and collective bargaining in the public and private sectors.

Turning to corporations, Biden says he would back legislation to implement financial penalties on companies that interfere with workers’ organizing efforts and boost funds to increase the number of investigators in labor and employment enforcement agencies to help prevent intentional misclassification of employees as independent contractors.

Biden would also eliminate noncompete clauses, revive regulations mandating companies report workplace injuries and work to force corporations to pay employees any overtime they are due.

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Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiTrump on collision course with Congress over bases with Confederate names Black lawmakers unveil bill to remove Confederate statues from Capitol Pelosi: Georgia primary ‘disgrace’ could preview an election debacle in November MORE (D-Calif.) issued a stern warning to the 2020 Democratic primary field that progressive policies that might fire up the party’s liberal wing could prove damaging in the general election.

Pelosi said proposals such as “Medicare for All” and a wealth tax that have been touted by Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenWarren, Democrats urge Trump to back down from veto threat over changing Confederate-named bases OVERNIGHT DEFENSE: Joint Chiefs chairman says he regrets participating in Trump photo-op | GOP senators back Joint Chiefs chairman who voiced regret over Trump photo-op | Senate panel approves 0B defense policy bill Trump on collision course with Congress over bases with Confederate names MORE (D-Mass.) and Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Hill’s 12:30 Report: Milley apologizes for church photo-op Harris grapples with defund the police movement amid veep talk Biden courts younger voters — who have been a weakness MORE (I-Vt.) could appeal to progressive pockets but fail to land in key swing states.

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“What works in San Francisco does not necessarily work in Michigan,” Pelosi said in an interview with Bloomberg News published Saturday. “What works in Michigan works in San Francisco — talking about workers’ rights and sharing prosperity.”

“Remember November,” she added. “You must win the Electoral College.”

While the California Democrat declined to endorse any candidate in the primary race, she unloaded on progressive policies, saying they fail to make inroads with swing voters who backed President TrumpDonald John TrumpSenate advances public lands bill in late-night vote Warren, Democrats urge Trump to back down from veto threat over changing Confederate-named bases Esper orders ‘After Action Review’ of National Guard’s role in protests MORE in 2016. 

“As a left-wing San Francisco liberal I can say to these people: What are you thinking?” Pelosi said. “You can ask the left — they’re unhappy with me for not being a socialist.”

The speaker specifically singled out Medicare for All as an example of a policy that may be beyond the pale for moderate voters the party will need to win back next year.

“Protect the Affordable Care Act — I think that’s the path to health care for all Americans. Medicare For All has its complications,” Pelosi said, adding that “the Affordable Care Act is a better benefit than Medicare.”

The comments come as Warren and Sanders remain in the top tier of the primary field, with the Massachusetts Democrat in particular laying claim to the title of front-runner in a series of national and early state polls.

The two progressives have fiercely defended their policies as bold proposals that are needed to shake up the status quo, hinting that their competitors’ policies fail to sufficiently restructure systems they slam as inequitable.

Warren tore into her critics Friday in defense of her Medicare for All plan after some Democrats voiced concerns over its cost.

“Democrats are not going to win by repeating Republican talking points and by dusting off the points of view of the giant insurance companies and the giant drug companies who don’t want to see any change in the law that will bite into their profits,” Warren fired back. 

“But if anyone wants to defend keeping those high profits for insurance companies and those high profits for drug companies and not making the top 1 percent pay a fair share in taxes and not making corporations pay a fair share in taxes, then I think they’re running in the wrong presidential primary,” she continued.

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Two of the triple threat match participants from TakeOver: WarGames are set to face off again on next week’s NXT.

Damian Priest vs. Killian Dain has been announced for NXT next Wednesday (December 4). It’s the first match to be confirmed for the episode.

Pete Dunne defeated Priest and Dain in their triple threat match at Saturday’s TakeOver event. Dunne was on Dain’s back and had him in a sleeper hold near the finish, with Dain breaking that up by dropping both of them onto Priest with a senton. Dunne then pinned Priest to get the win.

As a stipulation of winning the triple threat, Dunne advanced to Survivor Series and unsuccessfully challenged for Adam Cole’s NXT Championship.

Priest and Dain’s interactions in the TakeOver match were recapped on tonight’s episode of NXT. To build up Priest vs. Dain for next week, WWE claimed that Priest had injured his ribs at TakeOver.

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Io Shirai returned to action on NXT tonight and qualified for the upcoming number one contender’s ladder match.

A qualifying match between Xia Li and Aliyah had originally been announced for the episode, but there was an angle where it was shown that Li had been attacked backstage. Aliyah was happy about the attack and wanted to win by forfeit. It was then announced that Li wasn’t cleared to compete — but the returning Shirai was.

Shirai defeated Aliyah with a moonsault.

This was the first time Shirai has wrestled since she suffered a knee injury on January 22. 

In tonight’s second qualifying match, Candice LeRae submitted Kayden Carter with the Gargano Escape. Chelsea Green, Mia Yim, Tegan Nox, Shirai, and LeRae have now qualified for the number one contender’s ladder match. The final spot will be decided when Li, Aliyah, Carter, Dakota Kai, Deonna Purrazzo, and Shotzi Blackheart face off in a second chance gauntlet match next week.

The ladder match was originally scheduled to take place at NXT TakeOver: Tampa. WWE has announced that — starting next Wednesday — the matches that were planned for TakeOver will air on NXT television over the next several weeks. The ladder match is airing in two weeks (Wednesday, April 8).

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NXT Women’s Champion Rhea Ripley is defending her title against Charlotte Flair at WrestleMania 36. WWE hasn’t announced when the winner of the ladder match will be getting their title shot.

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